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King Edward VI Community College

King Edward VI Community College

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Key Stage 4

Compulsory Courses

GCSE English Language  - Exam Board AQA 

Assessment Structure

This is a linear course with two exams at the end of Year 11.

Topics Studied 

  • A range of fiction from the 20th and 21st centuries;
  • A range of literary non-fiction (such as journalism, diary writing, biographical and autobiographical writing, travel writing and letters) from the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries;
  • Creative writing for a variety of purposes, audiences and in a variety of forms – with an emphasis on writing short, crafted and self-edited pieces;
  • Speaking and listening in a range of situations but focusing particularly on formal presentations.

Why take this course?

  • This is a Core course which must be taken by every student in the country.
  • It is the qualification, along with Maths, which opens the door to further education and employment.
  • It helps students gain experience of the world through breadth and depth of literary study and discussion.
  • It builds on established literacy skills necessary to get along in life.

Where could it lead?

Post 16

There are a wide range of Level 3 courses available for English.  At Kennicott, this course can lead specifically to the combined English Language and Literature A Level.

Post 18

English is offered by almost every Higher Education provider in the country and students can further their study at any level of university, even following in the footsteps of one of our recent leavers who is now studying at Oxford University.

Career

English graduates find opportunities with many different employers.  Public and private sector organisations such as the National Health Service (NHS), educational institutions, local and national government, financial and legal firms, and voluntary and charitable organisations employ English graduates in a range of roles.  Other typical employers include:  publishing companies, advertising, marketing and public relations agencies and media organisations.

Contact

Miss S Killock

GCSE English Literature - Exam Board AQA 

Assessment Structure

This is a linear course with two exams at the end of Year 11.

Topics Studied 

  • A Shakespeare play (Romeo and Juliet, The Merchant of Venice, Julius Caesar, Much Ado About Nothing);
  • A 19th century novel (from Stevenson, Dickens, Bronte, Shelley, Austen, Conan Doyle);
  • A modern British novel (from Golding, Orwell, Ishiguro, Syal, Kelman, or an Anthology) or a modern British play (from Priestley, Russell, Bennett, Kelly, Stephens, Delaney);
  • A selection of poetry from 1789 to the present.

Why take this course?

 An interesting and cultured course which helps develops skills in analysis and inference.  It involves wide and deep reading of a range of British texts from Shakespeare to the present.  There will be opportunities for drama and discussion throughout the course.

It is excellent preparation for A Level English Literature or A level English Language and Literature.

English Literature is the qualification that demonstrates to others that you are thoughtful and cultured.  It also shows future employers that you are eloquent and can write.

Where could it lead?

Post 16

There are a wide range of Level 3 courses available for English.  At Kennicott, this course can lead specifically to the English Literature A Level.

Post 18

English is offered by almost every Higher Education provider in the country and students can further their study at any level of university, even following in the footsteps of one of our recent leavers who is now studying at Oxford University.

Career

The skills you gain through studying an English degree are marketable in most career  areas.  Jobs directly related to an English degree include:  editorial assistant; lexicographer; magazine journalist; newspaper journalist; teacher or writer.

Contact

Miss S Killock

Optional Courses

GCSE Film Studies - Exam Board WJEC
 

Assessment Structure

  • 50% Examination
  • 50% Controlled Assessment

Topics Studied 

Paper 1: Exploring Film

Four compulsory questions focusing on the Superhero film genre. These questions will assess knowledge and understanding of film language and key industry and audience issues. The film genre will be set by WJEC and will change every three years.

Paper 2: Exploring Film outside Hollywood

Three compulsory questions on one film produced outside Hollywood, chosen from a list prescribed by WJEC.  Questions will be based on characters, narratives, themes and issues in the film chosen, the way people, places, events and issues are represented in the film and a creative question involving individual responses to the film.

Controlled Assessment

  • An essay summarising industry research of a film of a candidate’s choice.
  • An essay analysing a short extract from the same film.
  • A pitch for an imaginary film.
  • A preproduction based on the pitch (such as a screenplay or storyboard).

Why take this course?

  • Because you get to make a film sequence which means you use cameras and a green screen.
  • Because it’s fun.  You watch films.  You write about films.  You write about creating your own film.  You create your own film.  You study Superhero films and foreign films and take an exam on them.

Where could it lead?

Post 16

Film Studies A-Level at Kennicott.

Post 18

There are a wide variety of Higher Education Courses in Film Studies, including at Russell Group Universities.

Career

Most graduates find jobs within the art/design/culture sector and, within the film industry itself as directors, video/film recorder operators and broadcasters.  Within the film, TV and video industries roles may include film/video/television editor, camera operator, photographer, art director, TV or film producer or production assistant, runner, location/props manager or programme researcher.

Contact

Mr. D Chilton

GCSE Media Studies - Exam Board AQA 

Assessment Structure

  • 50% Examination
  • 50% Controlled Assessment

Topics Studied 

Controlled Assessment: 

  • DVD Covers;
  • The Music Industry and Film Trailers;

Exam Topic: 

  • Could be Sci-Fi Films;
  • TV Quiz Shows, or TV Crime Drama.

Why take this course?

Because it is something which you use, probably all the time. And this means you need to understand it, otherwise people can use it to control you.

Because it’s fun, most of the time. Sometimes it’s depressing when you have to study TV News. Other times it’s really fun when you get to study Sci-Fi movies, the Music Industry and create things with cameras.

Because you get good results in this subject. If you do as the teachers ask, you’ll do well.  We have the best media equipment for a comprehensive school in the ‘known world’ which means you can create brilliant coursework if you do the work.

Where could it lead?

Post 16

Media Studies A Level at Kennicott/BTEC Media at Kennicott.

Post 18

There are a wide variety of Higher Education Courses in Media Studies, including at Russell Group Universities.

Career

A job in the media.  There are lots of jobs in the media. Everyone uses it now, so that means there are a lot of jobs.  Some business areas, such as advertising, marketing and communications, may also utilise the creative and analytical abilities of Media Studies graduates.  Teaching and lecturing are also potential career options.

Contact 

Mr. D Chilton